Eco-Warrior Profile: Carmen Jenny and the Power of Knowledge

3 weeks ago 2 min read
June 17, 2020
By: Annie Shea
Sustainability enthusiast Carmen Jenny is using fashion as a voice for change. You might ask, what does fashion have to do with the environment? Well, what many people don’t know is that the fashion industry accounts for 1.2 billion tons of carbon pollution every year. In fact, 85% of fast fashion in the US ends up in a landfill. Not to mention the terrible working conditions that people in countries like Bangladesh are forced to endure for a $12 crop top at H&M.
 
Moving from Switzerland to Germany, where she now works at iconic fashion magazine, Harper’s Bazaar, Carmen’s career opened her eyes to the industry’s detriments to our environment. “It wasn’t just one happening or one event that occurred, but the perspective I’ve gained over time in the last few years. The more I read, watched, and learned, the more intense it felt. Since then, I’ve known that I really want to make a change.”
Her aim starts with her Instagram account and blogazine, Carmitive, where she shares eco-friendly fashion and vegan, cruelty-free beauty tips. “Most people don’t actually know the stories behind the clothes they wear every day. So, I knew it was time to finally start to talk about it with as many people as possible, to spread knowledge and to show alternatives. Every step matters.”
 
Carmen makes it clear how powerful knowledge can be. While many people think that change is up to government or politics, Carmen insists there is power in numbers. “I think the more people showing demand for sustainability and taking important steps towards conscious consumer behavior, the faster and more efficient change can actually happen.”
 
2020 has certainly been a year of change so far. “It’s such an exceptional time we are in. So, if not using it for change for the better, what should we use it for?” Good point, Carmen.
 
Feeling inspired to make a positive change? Check out our article highlighting the other incredible women fighting against fast fashion for ways to start.